Posted in Writing

Two Stories and a Poem

It’s been a while since I’ve had any publication news to share, but when it rains, it pours. (Or, as we say here in Texas, when it rains… we run outside and spin around in it, because it feels a little like magic.)

If you’re looking for something to read on a rainy day or on a day too hot to go outside, consider choosing something that includes one of my stories or poems.

Ember: A Journal of Luminous Things

Ember_3.1_Cover_a8cd13ad-4eda-41c5-8153-9a3dfb9111cf_1024x1024Volume 3, Issue 1 of Ember is now available, and inside you’ll find “Teardrops and Watermelon Seeds.” This magical realism story was first published a few years ago in Spark: A Creative Anthology. It’s about a fourteen-year-old girl who goes through a summer of changes and is holding on to her memories in a unique way. I’m thrilled that E&GJ Little Press decided to publish it again because it’s one of my favorite stories. Plus, this time it’s paired with a beautiful illustration the talented Casey Robin and can be read alongside other stories for YA readers, including a few written by teenagers.

You can order a copy of Ember: A Journal of Luminous Things for yourself, your classroom, or a friend here. There are two print versions, one for $20 and one for $30. This journal is a little pricey, but it’s worth it. (Psst! If you plan on buying one, email me and I’ll give you a discount code for 35% off!)

Texas Poetry Calendar

TPC-Cover-PossI have been honored to have poems in the Texas Poetry Calendar eight times since 2009. These useful desk calendars, which have a weekly planner on one side of the page and a poem or two on the other, used to be published by Dos Gatos Press, but are now available through Kallisto Gaia Press. The 2019 volume includes my poem “Yellow,” which is about oak pollen. You can purchase one here. (Psst! I also have a poem in the 2018 calendar, and Dos Gatos Press has a few left. Get one here before the year is over!)

Entropy

goose-3190744_1280-1170x771If you don’t need a planner or are low on cash, you can still read one of my recent stories for free! “The Mayor” was published a couple of weeks ago in Entropy’s series titled “The Birds.” “The Mayor” is fiction, but is based on a true story. Read it here.

Coming Soon:

tales-to-terrify-logoI have one more story coming out soon. My clown horror story “Makeup,” which was a finalist in a Wattpad contest a couple of years ago, will be available for your listening pleasure on the Tales to Terrify podcast sometime in the next few months. I’ll keep you posted with the details when I know more.

I hope you enjoy perusing my work. Now, it’s time for me to get back to it…

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(To see a list of all of my published writing, click here.)

Posted in Writing

10 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Conference Experience

This weekend I’ll be attending the Writers’ League of Texas Agents & Editors Conference here in Austin. I’m excited because WLT always puts together a spectacular schedule for writers and invites a bunch of top-notch people from the publishing industry. But I haven’t been to a conference in a while, so I’m taking a moment to review my 10 Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Conference Experience. Maybe you should too!

If you’re also coming to the conference this weekend, let me know, and if you’re a first timer, hit me up with any questions you have. I’ve been to this event before and used to volunteer at it, so I know my way around pretty well. I’d be happy to help you navigate it. ☺

Carie Juettner

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A couple of years ago, during my week of 10 Writing Tips in 5 Days, I wrote a post called “Join the Club” about becoming a member of writing organizations and attending events and going to conferences. At the time, I was talking to myself as much as anyone else, because I was still a newbie at the whole networking thing and I needed that push to get involved.

Luckily, I took my own advice and got out there, and I’m so glad I did. I’ve grown more as a writer, learned more about the publishing business, and met so many more people than I ever could have by staying in front of my computer. Now that I have a few conferences under my belt, I want to share my…

Ten Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Conference Experience

#1: Plan Ahead.

Personally, I love planning. Anything…

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Posted in Writing

A Summer of Words

Summer

Writing is like exercise, and I am out of shape.

Writing is difficult, at least for me. I’m a perfectionist and a procrastinator, who’s easily distracted by new ideas, cute animals outside my window, and chocolate. None of these qualities do a consistent writer make. I’m also a teacher, and during the school year I’m a slave to my job, spending so much time teaching and grading and planning and collapsing from exhaustion, that a rarely write.

It’s not that I don’t have time to write. I do. I could. Others do it, and I exist in a state of constant awe of those people. But I don’t. Yes, I can pen a poem now and then, blog a couple of times a month, and maybe work on a short story. But the deep dive into novel work? No, I can’t take that plunge. I’ve tried. I’ve failed. I’ve quickly come up gasping for air.

HABIT

So, yes, writing is hard, and the longer I go without doing it, the harder it becomes. For real writing to happen, it must be a habit, and in order for something to be a habit, you have to start small. Anyone who’s ever tried to sprint without warming up first knows it’s a bad idea. You have to stretch. Build up your muscles.

That’s why I’m back to using 750words.com. This site’s monthly challenge has been the kick I’ve needed in the past, and I hope it will be the habit-builder I need now. On June 1st, I sat down at my computer (which was hard to do) and started typing (also hard). I used a prompt from my Storymatic cards, thought of a random scene in my novel, and wrote, sluggishly, for fifteen minutes or so before running out of steam. By that point, I had 295 words. And they weren’t good. I doubt any of those words will ultimately make it into my novel.

But I wrote them. And when I couldn’t take that scene any further, I stayed in the chair (which was the hardest of all) and kept writing. I wrote some questions about my novel (to be answered later), then I wrote some of this blog post. After an hour and twenty minutes in front of the computer, I finally got to 750 words. It wasn’t easy. It wasn’t pretty. But I did it. And then I went for a walk, because actual exercise is on my summer list too.

DISCIPLINE

For me, discipline in writing requires discipline in all aspects of life. I’d love to be able to sleep until ten, eat junk food all day, watch some TV, and then sit down and write a couple thousand brilliant words, but that’s not how it works. I need to move, be outside, drink lots of water, and fuel my brain with inspiration if I’m going to bring my best, consistently, to the page. That’s why, in some ways, my summer routine is more vigorous than my school year one. It includes daily walks, yoga, or swimming, as well as a healthy(ish) diet and plenty of reading time, both for fun and for research. Equal amounts of coffee and water. Equal amounts of sitting and stretching. Fewer naps and more walks. No TV during the day and time to read the latest Writer’s Digest.

I will not be perfect. Far from it. But if I don’t even make the effort, I won’t come close to succeeding. Already this summer, I’ve been more active in brain and body than I have in weeks, and it feels good. There will be lazy days and gooey chocolate brownies in my future, but hopefully they will be rewards well-earned.

MOTIVATON

Writing is hard, so writers need motivation to keep going. There’s no point in sprinting if you don’t have a destination or a finish line or something scary chasing you, so it’s important to set goals.

Goal setting is something I enjoy, but I’m not always smart about it. As a teacher who’s also a writer, I put a lot of pressure on my summers. The lists of things I want to accomplish is often enthusiastic to the point of overwhelming. Last year, my summer to-do list was three pages long and included all sorts of unrealistic expectations for someone just coming off her first year back in the classroom. At the end of the summer, I checked off some things, crossed off a lot more, and wrote “Hahahaha!” next to a few lofty objectives I didn’t come close to meeting. Realistic goals are key, and I’m trying to get better about that.

Also, motivation can come in many forms. It doesn’t have to be a finished novel. It can be the stay-in-bed day you promised yourself if you meet your word count for the week, or it can be a submission deadline for a publication you want to send your work to. Whatever it is, most of us perform better with a carrot hanging in front of us, so it’s important to find what motivates you and work toward it.

I was fortunate enough to receive a very nice piece of motivation this week. I’m so proud to announce that my current work-in-progress won first place in the middle grade category of the Writers’ League of Texas Manuscript Contest. This honor has earned me entrance to the always-awesome WLT Agents & Editors Conference at the end of this month, as well as a ten-minute consultation with the agent who chose my work as the winning entry. I’m incredibly excited about this opportunity, and now have a LOT of work ahead of me. I want to progress my novel as much as I can before the conference, so that I can (hopefully) speak intelligently about it to editors, agents, and fellow writers. Wish me luck!

In the end, though, none of that hard work will matter much in June if I don’t keep writing in July. And July’s work won’t mean much if I give up in August. So I must find new motivation and maintain discipline and keep getting to the page. Maybe, just maybe, if I fill my summer with words and truly make writing a habit, I can keep it up come September.

One can hope.