Posted in Teaching

Flattening the Learning Curve: The Challenges of Online Learning

I am a middle school teacher. This means I’m on my feet 6+ hours a day teaching, talking, demonstrating, modeling, interacting, performing, and making grocery lists in my head as I repeat the same thing I’ve said five times already. It means I am managing the attention, behavior, understanding, and personally-accommodated academic and emotional needs of 128 students every day, and I’m doing it in 46-minute increments while guided by bells like a Pavlovian trained monkey.

At least, that’s what it used to mean. Now, I’m sitting in front of my computer for hours a day, responding to emails, creating online lessons, participating in Zoom faculty meetings, and trying to remember if I left anything perishable in my desk at school.

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There are positives and negatives to this new life. On the plus side, I take about 1,000 breaks a day to kiss my dog. On the down side, it’s a little hard to keep up with the ever-changing, ever-evolving requirements and tools that are coming our way.

Monday: “Here is an amazing new platform that will help you serve your students online! Hooray! Our company is your hero!”

Tuesday: “Due to the fact that you are actually using this amazing new platform, it is now being overloaded and doesn’t work. Therefore, please wait patiently while we try to figure it out, or upgrade to the paid version of our service which your district hasn’t given you money to purchase.”

Wednesday: “Teachers, your students miss you! They need to see your face and know you care about them! Set up online video conferences with your classes to enrich, engage, and promote social emotional learning with your students!” (Insert lots of hearts and thumbs up emojis here.)

Thursday: “Attention Teachers: Do not, we repeat DO NOT hold video conferences with your students unless you are following the 74 guidelines listed below.”

    1. Always wear pants.

It’s enough to make your head spin.

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Me waiting for students to participate in my online office hours…

Not to mention the fact that many teachers are also parents. The only dependents I have to keep track of are my husband, my dog, my two cats, and my Roomba (who, I’ll admit, has been acting out lately), but many of my coworkers have young children at home, which means they are trying to work and parent at the same time. I can only imagine how impossible that is. Actually, I don’t have to imagine it. I’ve seen toddlers interrupt video conferences like adorable little tornados.

Then, of course, there’s the elephant in the room. Elephant, thy name is coronavirus. We all go about our days holding our heads high, trying to pretend that everything is fine while our world gets smaller and smaller and the elephant gets larger and larger. The truth is, we’re scared of the long-term effects of this pandemic. We’re worried about the health of our friends and loved ones. And we—the teachers, the educators, the adults that kids are told to turn to in times of crisis—don’t have any more answers than anyone else.

I think that might be the hardest part of all this. The helplessness. Most of us feel like we’re falling short in so many ways right now.

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Me pretending everything is fine and that I’m not freaking out and going stir crazy…

So let’s all take a deep breath and admit that we don’t have it all figured out yet.

Let’s take another deep breath and allow that the people around us aren’t perfect either.

Let’s take a third deep breath and remember that we’re in this together.

(Oh, whoops. I hope you were exhaling after each of those breaths. Otherwise you’re probably a bit red in the face by this point. Sorry if that was unclear. I’m not a yoga teacher and should obviously leave this stuff to the professionals. Just breathe. In, out. You get it.)

The thing is, we all need a little breathing room right now. So let’s give each other some space, not just physically, but emotionally too. Let’s allow some failure and understand that everything comes with a learning curve. Even learning.

And if the homeschooling just doesn’t work because you have no time or the internet is down or your student is being a bit of a pill today (trust me, he never acts that way at school), DON’T STRESS. Even though I’m a teacher who’s currently in the process of creating online learning opportunities for my students, I still believe this message I posted on Twitter last week.

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To sum up:
* Always wear pants during video conferences.
* Allow yourself not to be perfect.
* Allow others not to be perfect.
* Make space for the elephant in the room.
* Worry less about your kids’ academics and more about their health.
* Remember that we’re all in this together.

So long for now. Stay home, stay safe, stay sane, and send me a message if you’re bored or want to say hello or have a question that I can’t answer.

Posted in Lists, Reading

Carie’s Quarantine Reading List

Here’s a list of books to read during the apocalypse social distancing due to the Coronavirus. There’s something here for everyone.

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1. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

If you aren’t freaking out enough about COVID-19, read this science fiction novel about a pandemic that wipes out most of the world.

2. Greenglass House by Kate Milford

If you’re freaking out too much about COVID-19, read this heart-warming middle grade mystery about a family snowed in at their cozy, ramshackle inn with several intriguing guests. Read my full review of this wonderful book here.

3. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

Another heart-warming hotel story. This beautiful novel about a man who spends forty years in house arrest in a hotel is one of my favorite books. I highly recommend it.

4. The Shining by Stephen King

If you like hotels, but heart-warming isn’t your thing, read this very different story of a family snowed in at a large, haunted hotel. Read my post about this awesome horror novel here.

5. We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Constance and Merricat are pros at social distancing. This unsettling book from the POV of that “weird house” in the neighborhood stayed with me long after I read it.

6. Bel Canto by Ann Patchett

From Goodreads: “Days stretch into weeks, the weeks into months. Joined by no common language except music, the 58 international hostages and their captors forge unexpected bonds.” If you’re stuck in a foreign country or experiencing an unexpectedly extended vacation, check out this beautifully-written novel about a non-voluntary shelter-in-place scenario.

7. Surviving Antarctica: Reality TV 2083 by Andrea White

This dystopian YA novel takes a look at the future of remote learning. Spoiler alert: It involves reenactments of historical tragedies and kids unknowingly having cameras inserted into their eyes to film their plight for the world.

8. Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincott

This YA romance shows how you can still find love during social distancing.

9. The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey

Just in case this turns into the zombie apocalypse, we should all be informed.

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10. Strange Planet by Nathan W. Pyle

Because these are strange times we live in and these cartoons will make you smile.

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Happy reading! Remember, stay home & stay safe.

Posted in Poetry

Pandemic

Pandemic
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Coronavirus is on the tongue
of every passerby.
Gossip spreads faster than germs
and both are carriers of the disease.
We wash our hands raw
with soap and practicality
but can’t help inhaling the news.
Our map is full of pins
in places we’re not allowed to go
while vacations are both extended
and cancelled.
At a time when human comfort
seems like the best medicine
we isolate, wave from afar,
blow kisses into our elbows
and pray to the gods of science.

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– Carie Juettner
March 12, 2020