Posted in Writing

Phoenix

WOW.

That’s how I felt when I found out my story “Phoenix” had been selected as a runner-up in the WOW! Women on Writing Flash Fiction Contest.

I’ve been a WOW! reader for years. I first discovered their quarterly flash fiction contest back in 2013. I submitted a couple of times, without success. My writing wasn’t at the level they sought, and I didn’t yet have a good grasp of what flash fiction really meant. But I started reading their blog, The Muffin, where I drew inspiration from their writing tips and anecdotes, eventually becoming a guest blogger myself, twice in 2014 (in September and November) and again in 2016. I was honored to have my words share space with the women who had motivated me.

This fall, I decided I was ready to give the flash fiction contest another try. I submitted my 748-word story “Phoenix” and crossed my fingers.

“Phoenix” is a subtly witchy story about the power of nature and the power we hold within ourselves. It’s about persistence and sacrifice and a love for unwanted things. It’s unlike most of the pieces I write, and I didn’t know how it would be received, so I was ecstatic when I learned it had placed in the top ten of the contest.

(A visual collage of “Phoenix”)

I want to thank the editors at WOW! for selecting my story as a finalist and Heather Flaherty of The Bent Agency for choosing it as a runner-up. I appreciate you giving Gwen and her story a home.

Go to this link to read all the winning stories from the Fall 2018 Flash Fiction Contest. Or, to skip straight to “Phoenix,” simply click here.

WOW! will be publishing an interview with me on The Muffin, so if you’re interested in hearing the background story of “Phoenix” and what the writing process was like, stay tuned…

Posted in Poetry, Writing

How to Name a Lit Journal

I recently spent some time submitting poems in the hopes that 2018 might bring a few more acceptances my way. (2017 was a little quiet, in that respect.) While researching various publications, it occurred to me that there’s a pretty standard code for naming a lit journal. Just take an emotion or a color, add a bird or a plant, tack on a publication type, and… voilà! You’re ready for submissions.

Let’s try it, shall we?

Create your own literary journal using the chart below:

HowToNameALitJournal

 

My literary journal would be called… Morose Penguin Review.

I have to admit, that’s pretty awesome. 🙂

What’s yours? Share the name of your new lit journal in the comments.

Posted in Life, Teaching, Writing

3 Publications and 1 Excuse

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I’ve always loved the fall. Cool weather, crunchy leaves, and of course Halloween. This year, though, the season is throwing a few special treats my way, and I’d like to share them with you.

Coming Soon

My short story, “The Night Children,” will be published in the October issue of Havok Magazine. The theme is “Hallo-Whimsy” and my little horror story boasts a considerable amount of boogers and farts. 🙂

Next, my sci-fi flash fiction piece, “Reap,” will be published soon at DailyScienceFiction.com. I don’t know the exact date yet, but I’ll be sure to post the link when it appears. It will be free to read online.

Last, I’m thrilled to announce that my poetry chapbook, Death Can’t Sleep, was selected as the winner of the Yellow Chair Review chapbook competition! Here’s what Logen Cure, the contest’s judge, said about my work:

“Carie Juettner’s Death Can’t Sleep personifies Death in his everyday moments: waiting at the post office, ordering a latte, flying coach. Juettner strikes the perfect balance of fanciful and mundane in creating a reality in which everyone knows Death on sight; they make way for him in subway tunnels, avoid his doorstep on Halloween. These poems are imbued with sensitivity, humanity, and wry humor. Juettner’s Death is an ambivalent anti-hero, a necessary outsider, and I am grateful for this window into his world.”

I’m so proud of the little collection of poems and so excited that it will be published in 2017.

Excuses, Excuses

My biggest piece of news this month isn’t about a poem or a story or a book. It’s about a little bit of soul searching and a big decision.

Last week, I went back to teaching seventh grade English.

It happened fast, and I think the universe had a hand in making all the pieces line up just right. The short version is that I applied for the job, and one week later, on a full moon Friday, I was meeting my 150 students. I still don’t have an email address or any posters on my wall or even a mug with the mascot on it, but I’ve been teaching for a few days now and I feel pretty good.

Some of you are probably remembering this post about why I left teaching. I remember it too. I’m not taking it down. Every word of it was true. But it’s four years later and there are new truths to consider. It’s true that I’m older and wiser and better at managing my work/life balance. It’s true that I’m at a new school, in a new district. And it’s true that I’m a teacher. Deep down I’ve always been a teacher, and I was ready to go back.

I’m also still a writer. But… (Here’s where that excuse comes in.) While I’m learning the ropes at my new school and getting to know my many students and balancing the scales of work and life, my writing life may be a bit neglected. Already, my social media presence feels more like a social media absence, and I’m typing this post on the couch with my sore feet propped up on the coffee table, keeping one eye on the clock which is telling me I’d better get to bed soon if I want to be awake to greet my first period class.

So, if you don’t hear from me for awhile, don’t worry. I’m here! I’m okay! I’m just trapped under a pile of grading and trying to get 150 twelve-year-olds to stop asking me to “dab.” (<– I didn’t know what it was until last week either, and I refuse to discuss it in case my students found this post and actually read all the way to the end. Look it up. Or ask a middle schooler.)